New series reveals where women access contraception in 22 countries

With 2020 around the corner, how much have we learned about where women go for family planning products and services? The answers are as varied as the countries we’ve analyzed. SHOPS Plus completed a series of briefs examining 22 family planning markets.

The project published the briefs to give program implementers, donors, and policy makers a deeper understanding of family planning markets. Clear visualizations of contraceptive sources and implications sections are tailored to the current situation in each country. The briefs are intended to aid stakeholders in developing more sustainable and effective programs, and to provide policy makers with information they need to make strategic decisions.

The briefs highlight country-specific insights such as the fact that social marketing contributes to more than 20 percent of Afghanistan’s modern contraceptive rate and that users under age 20 in Benin are three times more likely to obtain their method from the private sector than users over age 25. In the Democratic Republic of the Congo, more than half of users from the poorest wealth quintile go to private sector sources for their contraception.

To prepare these briefs, SHOPS Plus researchers analyzed recent Demographic and Health Survey data from Family Planning 2020 focus countries to examine the contribution of both the public and private sectors to family planning.

Read the briefs.

Access Private Sector Counts, an interactive data visualization tool.

Watch a recorded webinar on Private Sector Counts.

 

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Sustaining Health Outcomes through the Private Sector (SHOPS) Plus is a five-year cooperative agreement (AID-OAA-A-15-00067) funded by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID). This website is made possible by the generous support of the American people through USAID. The information provided on this website is not official U.S. government information and does not represent the views or positions of USAID or the U.S. government.