Understanding Modern Contraceptive Sources Among Adolescents: A Global Analysis

The unique contraceptive needs of adolescents are increasingly recognized among the global family planning community. Despite recent progress to meet these needs, approximately half of adolescent pregnancies in low-income areas are unintended. Recent policy reports on adolescent contraception emphasize the need for high-quality data to inform efforts to increase adolescent contraceptive use, access, and choice. SHOPS Plus conducted a secondary analysis of Demographic and Health Survey data in 28 countries to examine where adolescents obtain their contraceptives, how sources vary by method and socioeconomic status, and the quality of care received by adolescents. The results elucidate the important role that the private sector plays in helping adolescents meet their reproductive intentions. Policymakers and program implementers must integrate youth-friendly and quality improvement interventions—which typically focus on public sources—into both public and private sources, including non-clinical private sector sources, as they strive to meet contraceptive demand and increase access among youth.

This poster was presented by Sarah Bradley at the Population Association of America Annual Meeting on April 11, 2019 in Austin, TX.

Author

Sarah E.K. Bradley; Tess Shiras

Published
July 2019
Resource Types
Presentation
Country
Afghanistan
Bangladesh
Benin
Bolivia
Botswana
Dominican Republic
Eastern and Southern Caribbean
Ethiopia
Ghana
Haiti
India
Jamaica
Jordan
Kenya
Madagascar
Malawi
Mali
Namibia
Nepal
Nicaragua
Nigeria
Pakistan
Paraguay
Peru
Philippines
Russia
Rwanda
Senegal
Sénégal
South Africa
Tanzania
Uganda
United Kingdom
United States
Zambia
Zimbabwe
Technical Area
Social and Behavior Change
Health Area
Family Planning
Keywords
contraceptives
fertility
gender
oral contraception
Current Downloads
9

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Sustaining Health Outcomes through the Private Sector (SHOPS) Plus is a five-year cooperative agreement (AID-OAA-A-15-00067) funded by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID). This website is made possible by the generous support of the American people through USAID. The information provided on this website is not official U.S. government information and does not represent the views or positions of USAID or the U.S. government.