Assessment of Madagascar businesses finds health partnership opportunities

An assessment of corporations in Madagascar found a growing interest among major industries to improve living conditions in their communities. Several companies are committed to participating in a national conversation about sustainable development and using new technologies to improve public health.

The SHOPS Plus team in Madagascar met with private companies—primarily mobile network operators, extractive companies, and other large employers—to determine their interest in and capacity for supporting health and community development programs in the priority areas of family planning; water, sanitation and hygiene; maternal and child health; HIV; and malaria.

The skyline of Antananarivo
The skyline of Antananarivo, Madagascar’s capital and largest city | Credit: Emily Mangone

“The telecommunications sector in particular has rapidly expanded, established new infrastructure, and is increasingly competitive, presenting key opportunities for partnering with mobile network operators who are eager to create shared value for clients by referring them to health products and information,” said Emily Mangone of SHOPS Plus, who co-led the assessment with Franҫoise Armand.

To determine the types of partnerships most likely to succeed in Madagascar, the SHOPS Plus team interviewed stakeholders from faith-based organizations, local civil society organizations, the Ministry of Health, and USAID implementing partners. The team also met with banks that could potentially participate in the Development Credit Authority loan guarantee program.
 

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Sustaining Health Outcomes through the Private Sector (SHOPS) Plus is a five-year cooperative agreement (AID-OAA-A-15-00067) funded by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID). This website is made possible by the generous support of the American people through USAID. The information provided on this website is not official U.S. government information and does not represent the views or positions of USAID or the U.S. government.